Listen & Learn

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While in traffic last week Friday, I realised that just like my student days, I still spend up to 40% of my time commuting, and waiting – waiting for meetings, waiting on appointments and so on.

Back then, I lived in a small but growing town, in Greater Manchester, which was at least 45 minutes away by bus from the library where I borrowed ACCA books, and from my job in town as a tax trainee;I was quite bothered about the valuable study time spent on buses. I thought “it’ll all fall in place right after my ACCA exams; surely my time will be more productive”. I realised at some point I had to make what time I had count for me.

I then decided to record definitions, and technical terms relevant to Audit paper F8 (which I was to take), and this worked for me! In a few days, I learnt by heart, definitions, and technical terms for my exam, while on my way to work/the library, and my study time was spent on other areas of the exam’s syllabus.

Listening to study notes is an effective method of studying, because the brain absorbs information heard faster than reading. Think about it, you hear a new song over the radio, and without consciously doing so, you realise you know the words to the song.

This method works best for subjects with more written (rather than calculation) content. I started recording my studies for my audit & assurance exam – F8, it also worked for P1, and I believe it can be useful for F4 and P7. I still record relevant definitions and technical terms for my upcoming IFRS certification.

To get the benefits of this quick and easy way of studying, all you need is a phone with a voice recorder (most phones have that), a quiet space, and follow these steps:

  • Mark out the areas of the syllabus you plan on recording in your study text
  • In a clear voice, read out the topic/title, and then record yourself, as you read
  • Remember to name each recording appropriately

Listen to your recordings as often as you can, you’ll be surprised by how much you have retained over a short period

Photo credit: dreamstime.com

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© countingonaccounting and Nuan Moji, 2013. The unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts & link may be used, if full & clear credit is given to Nuan Moji (blog owner), and countingonaccounting, with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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